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(Mary) Theresa Mager

(Mary) Theresa Mager

Female 1888 - 1960  (72 years)

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  • Name (Mary) Theresa Mager  [1, 2
    Born 9 Mar 1888  Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4
    Christened 11 Mar 1888  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Gender Female 
    Name Maria Theresia Mager  [5
    Name Mary Theresa Mager 
    Residence 13 Jun 1900  102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Occupation 20 Apr 1910  [2
    Operator, Undergarments 
    Reference Number PERS151 
    Residence 20 Apr 1910  102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Residence 1935  Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Residence 1940  77 Seymour Ave., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Died 4 Apr 1960  Rahway, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Buried 8 Apr 1960  St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery, Madison Hill Rd., Clark, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I151  Zellner Genealogy
    Last Modified 4 Dec 2019 

    Father Valerian Mager,   b. 13 Apr 1862, Zepfenhan, Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1913, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Anna Marie Steets,   b. 8 Apr 1863, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jun 1941, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 12 Jan 1886  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 8, 9, 10
    Reference Number MARR188 
    Documents
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    Essex, Newark, Ward 3, P. 75, Valerian Mager Family
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    Essex, Newark, Ward 3, P. 76, Mager & Steets Families
    1900 U.S. Census
    1900 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16A-B, Valerian Mager and Jacob Steets Families (1 of 2)
    1900 U.S. Census
    1900 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16A-B, Valerian Mager and Jacob Steets Families (2 of 2)
    1910 U.S. Census
    1910 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED17, P12-B, Valerian Mager Family
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    1920 U.S. Census
    1920 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED119, P. 22-A, Anna Steets Mager Family
    Family ID F60  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Louis William Sieben,   b. 18 Oct 1886, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1964, Rahway, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 24 Jun 1914  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [4, 11
    Reference Number MARR769 
    Children 
    +1. Norbert Joseph Sieben,   b. 3 Jul 1915, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Aug 1988, Hamilton Square, Mercer, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)  [natural]
     2. Gertrude Anna Sieben,   b. 19 Sep 1916, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Jan 2012, Arcadia Nursing and Rehabilitation Center, 151 - 9th Ave., Little Egg Harbor, Ocean, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 95 years)  [natural]
    +3. Louis August Sieben,   b. 29 Sep 1917, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Aug 2007, Rockaway, Morris, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
    +4. Martin Ferdinand Sieben,   b. 21 Apr 1921, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Apr 1991, Rahway, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 69 years)  [natural]
    +5. Cecelia Mary Sieben,   b. 29 Nov 1922, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Nov 2015  (Age 92 years)  [natural]
     6. Mary Theresa Sieben,   b. 31 Jan 1925, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Jul 1979, Lodi, Bergen, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years)  [natural]
    +7. Teresa Louise Sieben,   b. 19 May 1927, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 9 Oct 2017, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)  [natural]
    Documents
    1940 U.S. Census
    1940 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 16, ED25-506, P. 2B-3A, Louis Sieben & David Amory Families (1 of 2)
    1940 U.S. Census
    1940 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 16, ED25-506, P2B-3A, Louis Sieben & David Amory Families (2 of 2)
    Last Modified 4 Dec 2019 
    Family ID F77  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 9 Mar 1888 - Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 13 Jun 1900 - 102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 20 Apr 1910 - 102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1935 - Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 1940 - 77 Seymour Ave., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 4 Apr 1960 - Rahway, Union, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - 8 Apr 1960 - St. Mary's Catholic Cemetery, Madison Hill Rd., Clark, Union, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    1907 First Generation of Magers in America
    1907 First Generation of Magers in America
    Valerian Mager, Anna Steets & Children
    1941 Four generations: Anna Steets, Teresa Mager, Norbert Sieben, Tommy Sieben
    1941 Four generations: Anna Steets, Teresa Mager, Norbert Sieben, Tommy Sieben
    The Mager Girls
    The Mager Girls
    Magers & In-laws
    Magers & In-laws
    Rose Schaeffer Amory & Theresa Mager Sieben
    Rose Schaeffer Amory & Theresa Mager Sieben
    Lifelong friends
    Theresa Mager Sieben
    Theresa Mager Sieben
    Theresa Mager Sieben
    Theresa Mager Sieben
    Small portrait
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

    Videos At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.

  • Notes 
    • Recollections from family members solicited and compiled by Terese Schirmer Piccoli, organized and transcribed by Anne Marie Zellner:

      Gertrude Sieben:
      My mother was born on March 9th, 1888, the first child of Anna Steets and Valerian Mager. She had ten brothers and sisters. Mother was baptized in St. Mary’s Church on High Street in Newark, NJ when she was only a day old at the start of the blizzard of ’88, the one that’s remembered every year.

      Mother went to St. Mary’s School until the fifth grade and then she went to work. Things were tough in those days. Mother was a member of St. Mary’s choir and so was my father. In those days, they had a men’s choir and a women’s choir. Then things changed and the choirs went co-ed and Mama met Papa. There was a picnic and a dance. Dad asked Mother to dance, and she said Dad had two left feet. They went to the next year’s picnic and dance and Dad again asked to dance with Mother. Did he learn to dance!!!

      That was the start of their romance. After a reasonable courtship, they were married at St. Mary’s on June 24, 1914. They had an apartment in a brand new apartment house on 6 Somerset Street in Newark where they lived until they had 5 children and the 5 room apartment became too small for them. They then moved to 33 Montgomery St. to a flat with 7 rooms and a bathroom. (I forgot to say in their first apartment they had a bathroom which was quite a thing at that time. Mother said they had so much company -- mostly to see the indoor bathroom.)

      My brother Norbert was their first child born on July 3rd, 1915. I came next on Sept. 19th, 1916. Then came Buddy on Sept. 29, 1917. Marty came next on April 21, 1921, then Cele, Nov. 29th, 1922, Mary January 31st, 1925 and Teresa May 19, 1927.

      Such a loving gentle mother. The best wife and companion. They were made for each other. I know they must have had arguments; all married people do, but we never heard them argue. We had such a happy childhood. Mother was the best homemaker, cook, baker whose love for her husband and children knew no bounds.

      Every birthday and feast day was celebrated as a special occasion. The birthday person had their special meal and a big birthday cake. We also celebrated Washington Day, Lincoln Day, St. Patrick’s etc. All with a special dessert. Every day was a party.

      During the Depression, thanks be to God, my Dad always worked. We had plenty to eat. Mother made a lot from a little. No poor man ever knocked on our door that Mother didn’t make a meal for him and treat him with kindness and dignity. She always said, “He might be the Lord.”
      Mother went to the 6:30 Mass on Sunday, dressed in her best, with her engagement ring taken from the box, and after Mass, she’d come home, take off her ring, put it in the box until the next Sunday, take off her good clothes, put on a housedress and make breakfast, get the older kids ready for church, take care of the little ones. And so another week started.

      Monday was washday and she’d scrub on the board, hang up the wash on the line. Some days it was so cold the wash looked like boards on the line, they were so frozen. Tuesday was the ironing day plus general housework. Wednesday was sewing day, also mending day. Thursday -- anything that had to be done. Friday, baking day and what a good smell that day had. In the winter when we came home from school, Mother had hot chocolate and bread and butter with homemade jelly. Yum, yum, did that taste good. In the warm weather we were greeted with milk or lemonade and homemade goodies.

      Mother also had a “magic shawl.” One of her older lady friends came to our house and gave Mother an old black shawl. Why? I don’t know. In those days old black wool turned a funny green. We had a big closet in our dining room and mother hung that funny shawl on a hook right inside the door. When 7 kids got noisy and fussy, Mother would go to the closet, get that shawl and put it on. When we saw her do that, we thought she was going to leave us. When we saw Mother with the shawl on, we tearfully promised her we’d be good. For 2 hours we were angels. (Mother never told us she would leave us with that shawl on. She never said a word and that shawl worked like magic.)

      About 2 weeks before Easter, at breakfast, Mother asked Dad if he heard a noise during the night. Dad said, “no.” Mother said she did and maybe it was the Easter Bunny. Mother suggested we all look under our pillows. We did and you never saw such excitement over 2 jelly beans under each child’s pillow. We also had a chalkboard in the kitchen and the bunny wrote a note to the kids until I got smart and said, “That bunny writes just like Daddy. “

      I could go on and on with the memories of Mother. This I have to tell you. When the older children started to date, Mother would sit in a chair in the living room and pray her rosary until the daters were all safely home. Then she would go to bed.

      I don’t know how she did all she did. She washed, ironed, sewed for all of us. I was 14 before I had a bought coat. She cooked, cleaned, kept a nice home for all of us -- all on her own. We never had any help. One of Mother’s friends said the Blessed Mother helped her do it all. I’m sure she did.

      My mother was the greatest -- full of love for all of us and we for her. God bless her!!!

      We never went to the movies on Saturdays like the other kids in the neighborhood. We tried in our own little way to help Mother get her work finished and then Mother would read us a story and sing a song which we loved. I can still hear her singing; she had such a sweet voice.

      I also remember we never played hooky -- only once. If you said you didn’t feel well, Mother would say you can stay home from school today. However, we had to stay in bed all day and only get chicken soup for lunch and when the kids came home from school and played outside, we still had to stay in bed because we said we were sick. We only tried that once -- never again.

      Buddy Sieben:

      …You requested me to tell you some stories about my mother and I am finding that to be a difficult thing to do.

      I recall my mother as a beautiful, gentle, loving person who was devoted to her husband and children, who never complained about her lot in life, even during Depression years after my father lost his job because of the railroad strike. Perhaps we were poor, but she always made sure we were never hungry. I remember men and women coming to the door asking for a bite to eat, and she never let them go away hungry. My mother’s favorite expression was “maybe our ship will come in soon.”

      I remember my mother gathering her kids around the table and telling them stories and singing songs to them.

      For many Christmas Eves my mother would make breakfast for any relative who had gone to Midnight Mass, and of course your family (the Schirmers) was always there, except for your mother who was home tending to her babies.

      My mother was very particular about how she hung out the wash on the line that ran from the bedroom window at the back of our house to a pole at the end of our yard. Everything had to be in order, like sheets all together, then maybe shirts hung a certain way, then pants a certain way, etc.

      When we were kids we lived close to the hospital and often when we went out to play, my mother would say, “Be careful, but if you get hurt, don’t come home, go right to the hospital so you won’t get blood all over my kitchen floor.” Well, one day my brother Norb and I and a few friends were playing stick-ball in the street and I crawled under a parked car to retrieve a ball. As I backed out, a car came along and ran over my ankle and all the kids ran off so they wouldn’t get in trouble. I had limped to a stoop and the lady driver asked how I was. My brother came out of hiding and said to her, “My mother said he should go right to the hospital.” So the lady picked me up and took me to the emergency room. Then Norb went home and told my mother I had been run over and they took me to the hospital. She ran to the hospital without even taking her apron off. The doctor reported no broken bones, only a badly bruised leg.

      Both my mother and father could speak German very well, but mostly they only used that language when they didn’t want the kids to know what they were saying. My mother could not write in German, but she sang songs to us in German, mostly Christmas.

      I believe my sister Gert could understand some German but couldn’t read it or write it.

      I’m almost sure my mother never went to visit her aunt in Maryland. (Valerian’s sister was a Benedictine nun in Maryland)

      Yes, I went to St. Mary’s school, the whole nine years. I was in Mary Agnes (Schirmer)’s class and Gert was in Bill (Schirmer)’s class. Also, my mother also went to St. Mary’s and was taught by some of the same nuns who taught us. I still have a picture of our class graduation as well as our class ring. I remember being taught German in the second and third grades.

      My mom and dad both went to St. Mary’s as that was the German church in Newark. That’s where they met and were married. I think they both sang in the choir too.

      My mom worked in a garment factory in Newark where she operated a sewing machine. The factory was located at High and Orange Streets.

      Teresa (Sieben) Eggert:

      I thought I had not much to write, but now I realize I could have written a whole book about her. These are just a few events I thought I would mention.

      (By the way, thinking back, I remember how your dad, Uncle Gus, used to pick me up on Sunday mornings and take me to a candy store near St. Mary’s and buy me little hats made out of some delicious candy. (Wet ‘em & Wear ‘ems) How thoughtful of him taking time to be with me, having a big family of his own.

      All these things I think back on make me realize I was a very special little girl and now I’m a very special woman.

      On the day I was born, May 19, 1927, my mom was in St. Barnabas Hospital in Newark, NJ. She told me many times about the excitement all the nurses were experiencing the next day. It wasn’t over me, but Charles Lindberg landed in France after completing his solo flight over the Atlantic Ocean. I think of that each year on my birthday.

      My mom and dad were wonderful. I think Mom always put Dad first in her life and taught us to love and respect him as she did. And then there was our Faith. We were raised in a good Catholic home and many of our early fun times were Church-centered, picnics, parties at Church and all kinds of affairs.

      Mom was strict. The first day I went to school in kindergarten, I decided I’d rather be home so I played sick. My sister, Cele, in the 4th grade had to walk me home. I was put right to bed. The next day the same thing. The third day, Mom just put on her hat and coat and took me by the hand right back to school, strap in hand. That was the last time I tried that.

      Being the seventh and last child in the family (Mom was 39 when I was born), I remember her being sick a lot. Many times I knelt at her bedside and said the rosary with her, asking for her to get better. When I was 11 years old, I remember Mom sitting at the kitchen table on Thanksgiving Day telling me how to make the pies, stuff the turkey and do the rest of the dinner that day. She taught me well how to cook and bake. I loved doing it and eating it as well.

      We often went shopping together. We always had to go to Clinton Avenue to buy lisle stockings for my sisters and me since we had to wear them at Blessed Sacrament School and we did wear them out a lot. Sometimes we went to downtown Newark and had fun shopping for things.

      I was always called “spoiled” by my siblings because I was the “baby” of the family, but I didn’t think so.
      Mom was always home when we came home from school. On cold days she would fix hot cocoa for us when we got home. She was always there for us.

      Mom was a great neighbor. Wherever we lived, I remember so many neighbors coming in and all of them seemed to love her. She was very hospitable.

      What a wonderful cook she was! Everything was delicious. Mom could make the best meals on a very limited budget. Our friends were always welcome too.

      Health-wise, Mom was not too good. When I was six months old, she had repair surgery and was anointed several times. She said she prayed that the Lord would spare her life until I was ten years old. After I was ten, we always teased her and said she was living “on borrowed time.” She had angina very severely and many times she would choke and have to go outside to get her breath. We would be so frightened, thinking she was going to pass out any minute. She also had severe pain from gall bladder trouble. One of our uncles, Tom or Frank, I think, went to a priest who had something -- tea, I think -- and brought it to my mother. She took it and never had that problem again. When she was told she had diabetes, she had to go to the hospital for a week or so to be tested and have the sugar controlled before she could come home. We were terribly worried about her.

      When World War II started and my brothers Buddy and Marty had to go in the Army, Mom worried about them, of course, but prayer was her great friend. Like the rest of the world, we all rejoiced when it ended and both boys came home safely. Buddy had married an English girl Vera, and she came over with their 13 month old baby girl about a year or so later. Mom was thrilled to have them stay with us, but some of us resented the way she was taken advantage of by minding the baby and doing so many extra things for them. We were never allowed to say anything to Bud or Vera about that. When they bought a house of their own and left us we were happy for all of us. Now we tell Vera how we called her the “Queen” and how Bud treated her just like one. We have many laughs about the whole thing.

      Whenever we had a date, any of us girls, Mom was always waiting, rosary in hand, until we got home.

      When Mom and I went shopping for my wedding gown we went to every store in Newark and I tried many gowns on, returning to the first one I had on in Bamberger’s. I never even thought about getting lunch, I was so excited. Going home on the bus Mom had a terrible insulin shock. I was so sorry to put her through that, but she made it home and had her orange juice and something to eat. She never mentioned to me how she was feeling. Didn’t want to burst my bubble!

      After I was married and had children, Mom used to love us to come home. At least I thought so. I never realized how tiring it must have been for her. She used to come to our house when I had a new baby and stay for a few weeks. After three or four, one of my sisters would come. It got to be too much for Mom.

      When she was in the hospital during her final illness, Lew would drive me up to St. Elizabeth’s every other evening when he came home from work. I hated to see her suffer so much. She had cancer of the breast that had spread throughout her body. When it hit her brain, she would cry out in pain with headaches and believe me, Mom had a great tolerance of pain, so I know it must have been horrible for her. In the end, we prayed for the Lord to take her and He finally did. Our Mom was gone, but we’ll always remember her as she was in life, and pray to her now that she is home in Heaven with Jesus!

      Mary Agnes (Schirmer) Schoenberger

      I remember her as being very much like Mother (Mary Frances Mager Schirmer) and as the mother of our Sieben cousins. I felt the close proximity of the Sieben cousins was a plus for us as we always had someone to play with. They didn’t have a yard, so were in our yard most of the time.

      -------------------------------------

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] 1900 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T623, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16 A-B.

    2. [S11] 1910 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T624, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED17, P12-B.

    3. [S14] 1920 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T625, NJ, Essex Co., Newark City, Ward 3, S.D. 2, E.D. 24, Sht. 16, 6/14/1900.

    4. [S168] Parish Register of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, Newark, New Jersey.

    5. [S101] International Genealogical Index.

    6. [S481] 1940 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T627, Newark, Essex, New Jersey; Roll: T627_2427; Page: 2B-3A; Enumeration District: 25-506A.

    7. [S56] Das Mager-Buch: Geschichte einer Familie aus vier Jahrhunderten (Erganzungsband zum "Mager-Buch" 1935), Dr. Edwart Mager, (Name: Freiburg im Breisgau, 1972;), 80.

    8. [S55] Das Mager-Buch: Geschichte einer Familie aus vier Jahrhunderten, Dr. Edwart Mager, (Location: Freiburg im Breisgau; Date: 1935;), 193.

    9. [S130] Marriage Register of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, Newark, NJ, January 1858 - December 1888, 131.

    10. [S266] New Jersey, Marriages, 1678-1985.

    11. [S116] Kristen Eggert Vogel.