zellnerfamilygenealogy
The Zellners of Birmingham, Alabama, USA and associated families
First Name:  Last Name: 
[Advanced Search]  [Surnames]
Mary Frances Mager

Mary Frances Mager

Female 1889 - 1957  (68 years)

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Mary Frances Mager 
    Born 9 Mar 1889  Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Christened 10 Mar 1889  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Female 
    Name Mamie  [4
    Name Mary Mager  [3, 5, 6
    Residence 13 Jun 1900  102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Occupation 20 Apr 1910  [5
    Finisher, Jewelry 
    Reference Number PERS150 
    Residence 20 Apr 1910  102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Residence 7 Jan 1920  98 - 11th Ave., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Residence 5 Apr 1930  63 Crawford St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Residence 25 Apr 1942  949 N. Broad St., Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8
    Died 24 Dec 1957  Hillside, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I150  Zellner Genealogy
    Last Modified 4 Dec 2019 

    Father Valerian Mager,   b. 13 Apr 1862, Zepfenhan, Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, Germany Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Aug 1913, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Anna Marie Steets,   b. 8 Apr 1863, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Jun 1941, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 12 Jan 1886  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 9, 10, 11
    Reference Number MARR188 
    Documents
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    Essex, Newark, Ward 3, P. 75, Valerian Mager Family
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    1895 New Jersey State Census
    Essex, Newark, Ward 3, P. 76, Mager & Steets Families
    1900 U.S. Census
    1900 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16A-B, Valerian Mager and Jacob Steets Families (1 of 2)
    1900 U.S. Census
    1900 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16A-B, Valerian Mager and Jacob Steets Families (2 of 2)
    1910 U.S. Census
    1910 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED17, P12-B, Valerian Mager Family
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    1920 U.S. Census
    1920 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED119, P. 22-A, Anna Steets Mager Family
    Family ID F60  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family August Henry Schirmer,   b. 17 Dec 1889, Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Oct 1969, Hillside, Union, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Married 20 Oct 1915  Saint Mary of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, 528 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 12
    Reference Number MARR760 
    Children 
    +1. William Joseph Schirmer,   b. 15 Oct 1916, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 2006, Seacrest Village Nursing Home, 1001 Center St., Little Egg Harbor, Ocean, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)  [natural]
    +2. Mary Agnes Schirmer,   b. 28 Dec 1917, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Mar 2012, Oak Ridge, Anderson, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 94 years)  [natural]
     3. Angela Mary Schirmer,   b. 12 Sep 1919, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Jul 1992, Atchison, Atchison, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)  [natural]
     4. Bernadette Mary Schirmer,   b. 5 Dec 1921, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 May 2013, Mount St. Scholastica College, 801 S. 8th St., Atchison, Atchison, Kansas, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)  [natural]
     5. Catherine Mary Schirmer,   b. 4 May 1923, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jan 1981, La Verna Village Nursing Home, 904 S. Hall Ave., Savannah, Andrew, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)  [natural]
    +6. Margaret Mary Schirmer,   b. 5 Jun 1924, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jun 2016, Oak Ridge, Anderson, Tennessee, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 92 years)  [natural]
    +7. Elizabeth Mary Schirmer,   b. 31 Aug 1925, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 Sep 1996, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 71 years)  [natural]
    +8. Terese Mary Schirmer,   b. 15 Aug 1928, Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jul 2019, Chadds Ford, Delaware, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 90 years)  [natural]
    +9. Living
    Documents
    1920 U.S. Census
    1920 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 6, ED157, P6-B, August Schirmer Family
    1930 U.S. Census
    1930 U.S. Census
    NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 9, ED7-662, P9-B, August Schirmer Family
    Recordings
    2009-08-13 'Story Corps'
    2009-08-13 "Story Corps"
    Interview with Sr. Loretta "Bernie" Schirmer
    Last Modified 4 Dec 2019 
    Family ID F76  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 9 Mar 1889 - Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 13 Jun 1900 - 102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 20 Apr 1910 - 102 West St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 7 Jan 1920 - 98 - 11th Ave., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 5 Apr 1930 - 63 Crawford St., Newark, Essex, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsResidence - 25 Apr 1942 - 949 N. Broad St., Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 24 Dec 1957 - Hillside, Union, New Jersey, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Address       : Location       : City/Town       : County/Shire       : State/Province       : Country       : Not Set

  • Photos
    1907 First Generation of Magers in America
    1907 First Generation of Magers in America
    Valerian Mager, Anna Steets & Children
    The Mager Girls
    The Mager Girls
    Magers & In-laws
    Magers & In-laws

  • Notes 
    • Recollections from family members solicited and compiled by Terese Schirmer Piccoli, organized and transcribed by Anne Marie Zellner:

      Terese (Schirmer) Piccoli:

      Mary Frances Mager -- Mamie was Valerian and Anna’s second daughter, born in 1889, just a year after Theresa. She was a lovely child with dark brown eyes and thick brown hair. Soon there were three brothers, Charles, Frank and Joseph and a sister Josephine, all born before Mary started school at St. Mary’s, the German parish in Newark in 1897. The German nuns at the school made the children feel very much at home. At that time, the family lived at (102 West Street). Mary loved school and was a good student. The school only went up to sixth grade but the children were allowed to stay in that grade until they were old enough to work around age 15. Years later, Mamie would regale her children with the learning she had memorized… by the third year it was burned into her brain. She knew the states and capitals, and the rivers they were on (only the states as of 1903). She could recite the litany by heart, starting at the northeast corner of the nation: Maine, Augusta on the Merrimac, Vermont, Montpelier on the Onion (that’s what the river was called before they changed the name) New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Providence…. She would recite her history lessons. One that I remember best: Benjamin Franklin was the son of a soap and candle maker. He was born in Boston in 1706….

      When Mary left school she went to work at the usual women’s trades. Over the years until she married, she worked for a milliner, a corsetiere and a jeweler. Mary told stories to her children about “this young girl” who, on her first day at the millinery shop was asked to tack some flowers on a hat. A while later the milliner came by to see how she was doing, and saw nothing had been done. “I can’t find the tacks,” said the girl.

      Another time this young girl wanted to try out for the choir at church. She was very shy so she asked a friend to go with her. They both tried out, and the friend made it, but “this girl” did not. It was not until her children got a bit older that they realized that the stories about “that girl” were about Mary, herself.

      Mary worked for 12 (?) years before she was married as did all the children. Valerian was a shoemaker, and had steady work, but help was needed from all the older children as the family continued to grow. Three more girls and two boys were born in the next eight years. There were 11 children, six girls and five boys. Agnes was only six when she died of diphtheria in 1910.

      The church was the center of family life for the Magers. Valerian had his shop at the house.

      Gus Schirmer was from a large immigrant German family in Cleveland. He had gone to St. Ignatius College (high school) and Case School of Applied Science and was an electrical engineer. He had a job with Bell Telephone of New York. The older Mager brothers were ushers at St. Mary’s, the German parish Gus joined when he moved to Newark from Cleveland in 1912. He felt very much at home in the parish. The Mager brothers invited the young bachelor to their home where he met their two older sisters. Theresa was already keeping company with Louis Sieben. Gus (after a decent interval, of course), asked Mary to marry him.

      Gus and Mary were married on October 14, 1915 at St. Mary’s church, a lovely fall wedding with altar decorations of autumn leaves. Her sisters, Jotty and Anna were her bridesmaids, along with her friend, Anna Schramm. Her little sister Gertrude was the flower girl who turned 10 just a week after the wedding. (Her older sister Theresa was not in the wedding party since she had just given birth to her first son Norbert 3 months earlier)

      Gus became an expert in the subject of lightning when he worked for NY Telephone. He traveled extensively for many years, frequently being called on as a witness when lawsuits involved loss of life or property where lighting had been involved. He even had a patent for a protective device.

      Gus and Mary went on to have 1 son and 8 daughters.

      Mary Ag (“Sis” Schirmer) Schoenberger:

      My first thoughts as I look back on my memories of Mother are that she was a good mother -- loving, kind, soft-hearted and perhaps overshadowed by Dad.

      Actually, I can’t recall ever hearing her raise her voice. Discipline was not her thing. Neither was organization. Dad, for the most part, dished out the chores and the jobs and Mother went along with his decisions.

      I don’t recall Mother ever saying an unkind word about anyone. But I do recall that though she put St. Mary’s nuns on a pedestal, there was one rather odd or peculiar nun whom Mom conceded was “different.”

      Mother was very generous to charitable causes. Her favorite, I think, was Fr. Flannigan’s Boys Home in Omaha, Nebraska, to which she sent her entire monthly allowance ($10). In the same vein, she let it be known that money was preferable to other gifts because “I can get anything I want or need,” whereas money could go to one of her charities. In this respect Cathy was a chip off the old block -- always delighted to get money for her birthday even when she was living in New Orleans and couldn’t buy wool from Mrs. Ehrhardt.

      Mother was generous, not only with her spending money, but also with her love and thoughtfulness in reaching out to people -- especially the poor, the different, the odd -- that is those who might be looked down on by many others. I am thinking of Eddie Matthews, the old lady in a long black dress who rode a bicycle through the school yard to go to the grocery on Freylingheusen Avenue and then would sit on our back porch to rest and ended up eating lunch with us in the kitchen and telling us what a wonderful mother we had.

      I’m also thinking of all she did for people like Mary Jockel and Pauline Remmele (sp? Check with St V deP records!), a German lady who Mother paid to make dresses for Angie and me and maybe Bernie. They were typical German clothes and we looked like “Krauts” and hated to wear them.

      I recall also 2 Cabrini nuns who periodically begged from certain houses in the area and always stopped at 1018 for lunch -- one of them always making her own “stirred” eggs.

      Mother was also a very prayerful person with a deep devotion to the Blessed Mother -- hence all of us girls with the name Mary or Marie. She also had a deep appreciation for the Mass and in her later years went monthly with a few lady friends to hear Fr. Benedict Bradley, OSB lecture on the Mass. I believe this was pretty deep stuff but she seemed to absorb and appreciate it. I believe Mother was very intelligent and had she had the opportunity for a formal education, she would have excelled.

      Mother was also a loyal friend, for example, Isabel, Sr. Vitalis, the Kohl family, and some of the ladies and nuns at St. Catherine’s.
      I might sum up by saying that for me, Mother was a wonderful example of living out the two greatest commandments: love of God and love of Neighbor.

      Sr. Loretta Schirmer, OSB (Bernie):

      Mother was a deeply spiritual person who prayed her rosary daily and went to daily Mass whenever possible. I recall Isabel telling me how she and Mother made a retreat at the Cenacle in NY. Mother thought about entering the convent and talked to the retreat Master about it. He told her we needed good Mothers too. I also recall Mother giving up candy except for Christmas day for five years. I never did find out what her intention was for giving up the candy. Mother was very outgoing. She knew everyone at Church and greeted them by name.

      She loved to help others, such as Mrs. Thoma, Pauline R and Mary J. or anyone in need. I drove Mrs. Franery to Bamberger’s with all her children then brought the young ones to our house so she could finish shopping without them. Once a week in summer, I took the St. Catherine Sisters to Caldwell early Monday mornings. During the Depression, she invited young couples for Sunday dinner so the fellow would have some place to take his girl.

      Mother enjoyed cooking and was good at it. When the parish had bake sales, Mother’s cookies and cakes were sold before they ever got to the church. People would call to buy them. She enjoyed us too and would often say, “I don’t need to go to the movies, I have all the entertainment I need here at home.”

      She was very patient with us. I can’t recall her ever slapping any one of us. On Crawford Street, she used to come around every night to bless us with Holy Water. Before we had so many children, she used to read to us in the evening.

      A personal note: One day, Mother sent me upstairs for her purse. I didn’t want to go and yelled and stamped my feet on every step. Mother was in the dining room folding a basket of laundry. She never told me to stop yelling or stop making so much noise. I came down in the same way and gave her her purse in an ungracious way. All she said was, “I am going to keep sending you to get my purse until you can do it without the yelling and stamping.”’ I was young, but I could easily figure out how dumb I would be if I continued such behavior. I was not slapped, scolded or yelled at, just told what the consequences would be.

      Anne Marie (“Clockie” Schirmer) Cuff:

      When I was a freshman in college, we were given the assignment (by Sr. Kathleen nee Janice) of writing an essay about our mothers. I remember the first few sentences. “My mother is old-fashioned, fat and fifty (even though she was probably closer to sixty) no stylishly coifed matron one sees behind every weeping bride in magazine ads.” I’m not sure how it evolved from there, but I guess I went on to say that the former (old-fashioned etc.) was better than the latter.

      I think I was not as close to Mother as other members of the clan, probably because I received a lot of mothering from other members of the family. Sis did many practical things for me. Bettie dressed me; Margy told me about menses before Mother did (which she did do -- an activity not seeming to be one either of us wanted, but which was comfortable.)

      Some memories still linger from Crawford Street. There is some confusion in my mind as to what was real and what was part of our home movies. I do remember however, times when I insisted she carry me upstairs to bed because, “I was too tired to walk them.” (What a brat.) And she did this. I had to be at least a hefty 4 or 5 year old when she was still doing this. I wonder if Dad put a stop to this?

      I remember the house at 949 -- delicious outdoor freedom -- fun -- friends. Mother seemingly always welcoming them. Anna May, Barbara Musel -- always there, but I didn’t notice much. Many other people around -- Mary Jockl, Aunt Jotty, Eddie Matthews, the Vetters, and on weekends, Aunt Ella (of the extended tongue,) and relatives. Mother always there, but I was so self-absorbed. All those meals had to have more organization than I knew. I think she was a good cook. Not fancy but good.
      -------------------------------

  • Sources 
    1. [S56] Das Mager-Buch: Geschichte einer Familie aus vier Jahrhunderten (Erganzungsband zum "Mager-Buch" 1935), Dr. Edwart Mager, (Name: Freiburg im Breisgau, 1972;), 81.

    2. [S34] Baptismal Register of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, Newark, NJ, January 1889 - October 1908.

    3. [S9] 1900 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T623, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED24, P16 A-B.

    4. [S511] Terese Schirmer Piccoli.

    5. [S11] 1910 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T624, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 3, ED17, P12-B.

    6. [S15] 1930 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T626, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 9. ED7-662, P9-B.

    7. [S14] 1920 U.S. Census, Population Schedule; NARA Microfilm Publication T625, NJ, Essex, Newark, Ward 6, ED157, P6-B.

    8. [S218] WWII Civilian Draft Registration Card, Gus Schirmer.

    9. [S55] Das Mager-Buch: Geschichte einer Familie aus vier Jahrhunderten, Dr. Edwart Mager, (Location: Freiburg im Breisgau; Date: 1935;), 193.

    10. [S130] Marriage Register of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, Newark, NJ, January 1858 - December 1888, 131.

    11. [S266] New Jersey, Marriages, 1678-1985.

    12. [S168] Parish Register of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, Newark, New Jersey.